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Featured Item Chandelier 00997
with details

French 24-arm
chandelier, c 1900
Baccarat crystal
45" w x 60" h

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chandelier 00997

chandelier 00997 detail A

 

 
 
Reference Information on Pieces in Our Collection
M N O
 



The Massier ceramics company, founded before the French Revolution in 1707, stayed in the family through many generations. However, it was the talented Clement, who, along with his brother Delphin, moved the family ceramics business from its utilitarian origins into the world of art ceramics in the late 19th century. Clement learned much of his art from an Italian potter, Gaetano Gandolfi, who worked for his father, and with him experimented with iridescent glazes. The iridescent lustre glazes and later metallic luster glazes made the Massier ceramics works famous.

In 1885 Clement Massier hired Lucien Levy as the company's artistic director. Levy encouraged Clement's work with metallic glazes and intricate painted surface patterns. The turquoise metallic luster glaze that won first prize the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1889. was perfected during Levy's first year with the company.

Siegfried Bing opened his Paris gallery, Galerie L'Art Nouveau, in 1895, showing the finest decorative arts in the new style, including Henry van de Velde furniture, Louis Comfort Tiffany glass and Clement Massier ceramics.

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Mathieu, Henri


Henri Mathieu was both a lighting designer and antique lighting restorer who established his business, Mathieu Lustrerie, in Gargas, France, in 1948. His mid-century designs featured a organic and geometric forms in metal accented with vivid color.

His restoration work can be seen in Versailles' Hall of Mirrors, in the Farnese Palace in Rome, and the Monaco Opera House. The French Culture Ministry awarded Mathieu Lustrerie the "Living Heritage Firm Award."

The firm, active today and well-known throughout Europe, has been run by his son, Regis Mathieu. since the early 90s. The firm now creates a blend of modern and traditional work, often using precious maerials, as well as continues with its much sought after restoration services. Many sumptious contemporary designs are created by him for the showrooms of great Paris fashion houses like Cartier and Hermes

Regis is expanding the business into India with new designs oriented toward the Indian market and has established a manuactory on a farm in Chhatarpur, Delhi.

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Small Paris-based lighting company founded by Pierre Maynardier and active during the Art Deco period. Competetive with Schneider, Muller Freres, Degué and others.

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Louis Auguste Moreau (1855- 1919) comes from a long line of Dijonnaise sculptors. He worked primarily in the Art Nouveau style and had his pieces cast both in bronze and spelter.

With his brother, Hippolyte Francois Moreau (1857-1930), both a sculptor and a painter specializing in genre subjects, Louis Auguste set up a studio partnership, L & F Moreau, for the casting of their works in spelter. These editions were marked L & F Moreau. The studio also individually produced pieces of bronze and spelter. These were signed "Auguste" or "Hippolyte"

THE MOREAU SCULPTORS
Jean-Baptiste Moreau (1797-1855) of Dijon;
Mathurin Moreau (1822-1912) eldest son of above
Hippolyte Francois Moreau (1832-1927) brother of the above;
Auguste Louis Mathurin Moreau (1834-1917) brother of above;
Louis Auguste Moreau (1855- 1919) son of above;
Hippolyte Francois Moreau (1857-1930) brother of above

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Muller Frères Lunéville The Muller brothers (Henri and Eugène) came from a long line of glass workers. In 1871 the family fled the German annexation of Alsace. Henri and Eugène settled in Lunéville and worked for Emile Gallé for a time. Some of their brothers worked there too.

In 1875, they established their own glassworks company in Lunéville. Masters of all traditional glassmaking techniques, the Mullers experimented with new methods. They became known for their fine Art Nouveau work, and were competitive with Daum in that arena. After WWI Muller Frères bought a chandelier factory and began making Art Deco chandeliers and wall sconces. The company ceased business in 1936.

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Murano glass, made in a small group of islands in the lagoon of Venice, Italy, has a history that dates back at least a millenium. In the 13th and 14th centuries the master glass-blowers were confined to the islands to prevent them from sharing their secrets [and probably to remove a fire hazard from the city of Venice proper]. The beautiful Murano glass that has long been world-renowned is still made much the same way.

Traditional Murano-glass making techniques make use of lampworking, or working glass at a flame source such as a torch. The silica-based glass becomes liquid at high temperatures. As the glass cools it passes from a liquid to a solid state. During this interval it is soft and malleable and the glass-master can shape the material. The flux or melting agents, soften at lower temperatures. The more sodium oxide present in the glass, the slower it solidifies. This is important for hand-working because it allows the glassmaker more time to shape the material. The various raw materials that an artisan might add to a glass mixture are sodium (to make the glass surface opaque), nitrate and arsenic (to eliminate bubbles) and colouring or opacifying substances.

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Noverdy worked at Muller Freres before leaving to start his own glassworks in Dijon in the 1920s. He created his own unique style: globular vases with long thin necks; acid-etched cameo glass; pate de verre [glass paste] in signature colors cobalt blue, orange, purple; blown double glass shades. His Art Glass was competitive with Daum and Galle.

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Alexandre Ouline (act. 1918 - 1940), Belgian sculptor working in France during the early 20th century worked in the Art Deco style and was particularly well-known for bronze figural and bust sculpture. He worked in both bronze and spelter. May have used pseudonyms such as "Oudine" or "Ondine" [or they may have been mismarked by the foundry or misread by the reviewer].

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